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THE CLEVELAND MUSEUM OF ART 


Ingalls Library 










THE LIBRARY 
OF THE CLEVELAND 
MUSEUM OF ART 


HANDBOOK OF 

THE CLEVELAND MUSEUM OF ART 

EAST BOULEVARD AT BELLFLOWER ROAD 
IN WADE PARK 


\ 


SECOND EDITION 
CLEVELAND, OHIO 
MARCH, MCMXXVIII 



(0896 













FOREWORD 


SC^his handbook, will assist the visitor who wishes to make a 
more or less systematic tour of the Museum, a tour which shall 
start in the Rotunda and follow the galleries from I through 
XV; it will give him some information, although obviously it 
cannot give him a great deal, about the illustrated objects. 

We have tried to select objects of special significance for 
illustration in this book, although some attempt has been made 
to represent the various collections and donors * 

Because the policy of the Museum is to show at one time 
only such objects as can be assembled attractively and con¬ 
sistently and to change the arrangement at fairly frequent in¬ 
tervals, there are only a few objects belonging to the Museum 
which are always on exhibition. If an object illustrated should 
not happen to be on view, the visitor who is particularly anxious 
to see it can usually have it shown him in storage, if he will 
apply to the General Office on the ground floor during office 
hours, 9 a. m. to 5 p. m. on business days, 9 a. m. to 1 p. m. on 
Saturdays. 

March, 1928. 

CONTENTS 


View of the Museum from the Euclid Avenue Terrace Frontispiece 

View of the Interior from the Main Entrance Page 4 

The Garden Court, Looking toward the Rotunda 5 

The Armor Court from the Rotunda 6 

Department of Early American Art, Gallery I 7 

Department of Decorative Arts, Galleries II-III 10 

Department of Paintings, Galleries IV-VIII 16 

Special Exhibitions, Galleries IX-X 46 

Department of Prints and Drawings, Gallery XI 47 

Department of Oriental Art, Galleries XII-XIV 58 

Department of Egyptian Art, Gallery XV 68 

Department of Decorative Art, Armor Court 71 

Department of Classical Art, Garden Court, Loggia, Rotunda 74 

Textile Study Room 81 

Services to the Public 83 

History and Building 8 5 

Ground Floor Plan 86 

Exhibition Floor Plan 87 

Officers, Staff, Membership, etc. 88 


THE CLEVELAND MUSEUM OF ART 



VIEW OF THE INTERIOR FROM THE MAIN ENTRANCE 


4 
























THE CLEVELAND MUSEUM OF ART 



THE GARDEN COURT, LOOKING TOWARD THE ROTUNDA 


5 






















THE CLEVELAND MUSEUM OF ART 



THE ARMOR COURT FROM THE ROTUNDA 


6 














DEPARTMENT OF EARLY AMERICAN ART, GALLERY I 



EARLY AMERICAN SILVER. XVII-XIX Century. Gift of J. H. Wade, 1919*1921. 

The Colonial silversmiths represented in the Museum Collection cover a 
range of one hundred years, from John Burt of Massachusetts, born in 1691, 
to Thomas Coit, of Connecticut, born in 1791. Among them is Paul Revere, 
famous silversmith as well as famous patriot. 

A handsomely engraved tea pot (not illustrated) by Nathaniel Hurd, 
whose portrait by Copley appears on page 8, is included in the important 
collection of silver lent by Hollis French of Boston. 


7 















DEPARTMENT OF EARLY AMERICAN ART > GALLERY I 



NATJHANIEL HURD (Boston silversmith and engraver), by Jolrn Singleton Copley, 
815. The John Huntington Collection, 1916. Sizes 30x2534 inches* 


The collection of paintings and handicrafts shown in Gallery 1 indicates that 
early in the Colonial days the instinct for artistic expression manifested 
itself in the more settled parts of the country. Portraits such as those illus¬ 
trated on this page and the next show that capable artists were developed. 
Eleven painters born before the Revolution are represented in the collection. 

The portraits illustrated represent the work of the earliest artist (Hesse- 
lius, born in 1682)* of one in his prime at the time of the Revolution (Copley, 
born in 1737)5 and of two still working during the War of 1812 (Jarvis, born 
in 1780, and Sully, born in 1783)* 

' \ 


8 



DEPARTMENT OF EARLY AMERICAN ART- GALLERY I 




Left: OLD PAT, by John Wesley Jarvis, 1780-1834. Gift of J- H. Wade, 1916. Size: 
29^ x 24)4 inches. Right; CAPTAIN JEAN T. DAVID, by Thomas Sully* 1783-1872. 
The John Huntington Collection, 1916. Size; 35)4 x 27^4 inches. 

9 


MRS. MARY HET SMITH, by Gustavus Hesselius, 1682-1755, The Hinmau B. 
Hurlbut Collection, 1923, Size; 31 x 25 inches. 






DEPARTMENT OF DECORATIVE ARTS. GALLERY II 



ENGLISH PORCELAIN, Chelsea, Bow, and Bristol, late XVIII Century, The 
Mary Warden Harkness Collection, Bequeathed, 1917, Sizes; upper left 1014 inches 
high; upper right 11 inches high; lower left 10% inches high;lower right 12 inches high. 


These delightful ornaments reflect the eighteenth century in their charm and 
frivolity. Such fanciful objects went well with the furniture of the period 
whether it was made by Chippendale, Sheraton, or Hepplewhite, The two 
upper figures are Bristol ware. The figure of Britannia at the lower left is a 
rare example of Bow workmanship. The candlestick is from the Chelsea 
factory after designs by Roubiliac, 


10 








DEPARTMENT OF DECORATIVE ARTS, GALLERY III 



The use of human figures as symbols, and the monumental effect gained 
thereby, show the influence of Byzantium on western European art. The 
central group above represents Christ in an aureole, sup ported by the symbols 
of the Evangelists and flanked by angels. The other figures are the Apostles. 
These plaques were made by the same artist who carved the famous altar at 
Melk in Germany. 


PANELS OF MORSE OR WALRUS IVORY. German, end of XI Century. Gift of 
J. H. Wade, 1922. Sizes: 2 x 634 inches, 2 x 43^ inches, and 2 x 634 inches. 


II 





DEPARTMENT OF DECORATIVE ARTS, GALLERY III 




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DEPARTMENT OF DECORATIVE ARTS, GALLERY III 



IVORY. Byzantine, XI Century. Gift of J. H. Wade, 1925. Size: 10 x 6 inches. 

This important ivory was formerly in the Stroganoff Collection in Rome. 


l 3 





















DEPARTMENT OF DECORATIVE ARTS, GALLERY III 



IVORY; CENTRAL PANEL OF TABERNACLE. French, early XIV Century, 
Work&hop of the Tabernacles of the Virgin. Gift of Mr. and Mrs. John L, Severance and 
J. H. Wade, 1923* Size: 9 x 4)^ inches. 


This ivory shows early Gothic art at its best. In it there is linear grace. The 
delicate idealism of the figures is no longer merely symbolic, as in Byzantine 
and Romanesque art; there is humanity but not the realism seen in the art of 
succeeding centuries. The faces smile with a self-contained quality which 
later was to become affectation. Compare this with the illustrations on pages 
13 and 11. The plaque is one of the largest of its kind, and is ranked by 
Koechlin, the great French authority, as one of the finest of its group. 


H 







DEPARTMENT OF DECORATIVE ARTS, GALLERY III 




CHAMPLEVE ENAMEL RELIQUARY. Mosan, about 1150. Attributed to Gode- 
froid de Claire. Purchase from the J. H. Wade Fund, 1926* Size: 7^ x 6 % inches. 


PORTABLE ALTAR. Walrus ivory and enameL Rhenish, Cologne, about 1200, 
Purchase from the J. H, Wade Fund, 1927. Size: 1% x 10^ x 6 % inches. 









DEPARTMENT OF DECORATIVE ARTS, GALLERY III 



CHAMPLEVE ENAMEL CROSS, French, Limoges, about 1200 A, D. Gift of J. H. 
Wade, 1923. Size: 26% x 17^ inches. 


In Champleve, the pattern was dug out and the depression filled with enamel, 

16 












DEPARTMENT OF DECORATIVE ARTS > GALLERY III 



CROSS, Rock crystal, gold, and enamel German, second half of XIII Century. 
Purchase from the J. H. Wade Fund, 1927. Size: 27^ x 20 % inches. 


Called The Cross of the Emperor Rudolph, the first Hapsburg emperor of the 
Holy Roman Empire, 


17 






DEPARTMENT OF DECORATIVE ARTS, GALLERY III 



A TABLE FOUNTAIN OF SILVER-GILT AND ENAMEL, French, end of 
XIV Century* Gift of JL H. Wade, 1924. Size: x 9^ inches. 


This fountain was unearthed in the garden of a palace in Constantinople, 
Wine or perfume was forced through the central support to the thirty-two 
outlets* The four outlets on the topmost level are lions and dragons. Below, 
animal or human figures spouted on small paddle wheels, which, in turning, 
rang tiny bells. The enamel subjects represent human or animal figures play¬ 
ing instruments or drinking from streams of water. They thus emphasize the 
two appeals of the fountain, the satisfaction of the ear and the satisfaction 
of thirst. 


18 







DEPARTMENT OF DECORATIVE ARTS, GALLERY III 



PAINTED TERRA-COTTA: THE SAMARITAN WOMAN AT THE WELL, 
by Giovanni della Robbia, Italian, Florentine School, about 1520. Gift of Samuel 
Mather, 1922. Size: 92 x 78 inches. 


A characteristic type of Italian Renaissance sculpture was enamelled terra¬ 
cotta, introduced by Luca della Robbia. In this the terra-cotta was covered 
with a white enamel glaze. Simple monumental types and few colors were 
used. Andrea della Robbia, a nephew, in continuing the tradition, used more 
sentimentalized forms and more colors. The author of the piece illustrated 
above, Giovanni della Robbia, was Andrea’s son. He turned towards realism, 
introducing landscape backgrounds and even more colors than his father. 
He often painted rather than enamelled the terra-cotta, as in this piece. 

19 









DEPARTMENT OF DECORATIVE ARTS, GALLERY III 




20 


TWO ANGELS. Italian, middle of XIV Century, Attributed to Giovanni and Pacio da Firenze. 

The John Huntington Collection, 19^5. Sizes: 3934 x 14% x 8 inches and 39 x 22^4 x 10 inches. 

These angels are characteristic of Neapolitan sculpture* under the influence of the Pisan and. Florentine styles. 




DEPARTMENT OF DECORATIVE ARTS, GALLERY III 






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21 




DEPARTMENT OF DECORATIVE ARTS, GALLERY III 




Italian, Sienese 3 first half of XIV Century* 
Size: 3J4' x 2J.4 inches. 


French, second half of XV Century- 
Size: 5x31^ inches. 


Italian, Bolognese, second half of XIV Century* Size: io>£ x 8 inches* 

THREE PAGES FROM ILLUMINATED MANUSCRIPTS. Gift of J, H. Wade, 1924* 

These illuminated miniatures are really paintings reduced in size so that they 
could form illustrations in the text of manuscripts* Manuscripts and minia¬ 
tures were made in many cases by specially trained monks in the monasteries- 


22 




























DEPARTMENT OF PAINTINGS* GALLERY IV 



SIR ANTHONY MIL DM AY, by J&aaedOliKeE, v English, 1566-1617. Purchase from 

the J. H. Wade Fund, 1916, Size: 9^ x 6 % inchbr u> ^ { e.Utdft.5 tV \ \ t 1 OlITcL 1 S '3 *7 - I » ^ 


Isaac Oliver was the father of English miniature painting* and this is one of 
his most important miniatures. Sir Anthony Mildmay was English ambassa¬ 
dor to France at the time of James the Second and was a man of considerable 
distinction at the court. 


2 3 


























This tapestry shows the flat, all-over pattern characteristic of Gothic 
tapestry weaving. 


DEPARTMENT OF DECORATIVE ARTS, GALLERY III 





























DEPARTMENT OF PAINTINGS, GALLERY IV 



MADONNA AND CHILD AND ADORING SAINTS, by Sano di Pietro, Italian, 
Sienese School, 1406-1481. Gift of Mrs. B. P. Bole, Mr. and Mrs. Guerdon S. Holden, 
Mrs. Windsor T. White, and The Holden Fund, 1924. Size: 22 % x 10 % inches. 


This shows the aloof, decorative, linear treatment which marked Sienese 
painting. It contrasts with the realistic quality of much of Florentine art. 

26 



















DEPARTMENT OF PAINTINGS. GALLERY IV 



THE VIRGIN AND CHILD, by Francesco Bcttidni, 1446 (fJ-1497, Italian, Floren¬ 
tine School, Gift of Mrs, Liberty E, Holden, 1916, Size; 26 % x 18 ^ inches, 

Botticini was much influenced by Botticelli, and shows this in his linear treat¬ 
ment and formalized color scheme. With his master he is a figure who is not 
in the main realistic stream of Florentine art. 


V 




DEPARTMENT OF PAINTINGS, GALLERY IV 



MADONNA AND CHILD WITH SAINTS, by Lorenzo da San Severing Italian, 
Umbrian School, died in 3503. Gift of Mrs. Liberty E* Holden, 1916, Size; 56x 33^ 
inches. 

This altar piece with its naive figures against a background of dull gold 
contrasts with the sophistication of the sixteenth century manner seen in the 
“Portrait of a Gentleman and His Wife,” illustrated on page 29. 

28 









DEPARTMENT OF PAINTINGS, GALLERY IV 



PORTRAIT OF A GENTLEMAN AND HIS WIFE, by Giovanni Battista Moroni, 
Italian, Lombard School, I52 o- 25-“I578* Gift of Mrs* Liberty E. Holden, 3916, Size: 
39H * 55H i^hes. 


This double portrait is an example of accomplished technique and knowledge* 
The later Renaissance has learned its lesson well as far as realistic representa¬ 
tion goes* The details of jewelry and costume, the quality of textures, the 
character of the sitters are all ably presented. Characteristic oftthe school and 
of the artist is the background of light grey against which the silhouette 
counts effectively. It is the formal portrait of the day. 

Moroni was a pupil of Moretto of Brescia, and both give a typical expression 
of the Lombard manner as it was localized and spread from the little city of 
Brescia* Moroni also bears the marks of his association with Lorenzo Lotto, 
an artist usually grouped with the Venetians* Contrast this portrait with the 
portrait of Giuliano de’ Medici by Salviati (in the same gallery) which has 
the characteristic form qualities of Florentine art at this time. 

In this gallery are many other examples of Italian painting* Important 
among them is a cassone panel, showing a horse race in the streets of Florence, 
which was made for a wedding celebrated between the members of two prom¬ 
inent Florentine families in the year 141#. It is the earliest known dated 
cassone panel. Other important pictures, early in date, are the small Floren¬ 
tine “Crucifixion” and the large “Madonna and Child” of the School of the 
Marches* Among the more important later pictures are the “Entombment,” 
by Leandro Rassano and the “Madonna and Child,” by some close follower of 
Leonardo da Vinci. 





DEPARTMENT OF PAINTINGS, GALLERY V 



MADONNA AND CHILD, by Jacopo Robnsti, called Tintoretto, Italian, Venetian 
School, 1518-1594. The John Huntington Collection, 1917. Size: 36^ x inches. 


3° 





DEPARTMENT OF PAINTINGS, GALLERY V 



A BISHOP. Southern French or Spanish (?), about 1425* Gift of The Friends of The 
Cleveland Museum of Art, 1927, Size: 6-8 x 42 inches* 


31 









DEPARTMENT OF PAINTINGS, GALLERY V 



THE HOLY FAMILY, by Dominico Theotocopuli, called El Greco, Spanish, 1545?" 

1614. Gift of The Friends of The Cleveland Museum of Art in memory of J. H. Wade, 

1926. Size: $1% Jc 39 J4 inches. 

El Greco came from Crete to Venice, where he was greatly influenced by 
Tintoretto. Then he went to Spain, called by the prospect of work on the 
Eseorial, Philip the Second’s huge palace. Failing to get this, he found at last 
in Toledo the employment and appreciation that were his due. The mass of 
his work is there today and constitutes the city’s greatest glory. 


32 





DEPARTMENT OF PAINTINGS, GALLERY V 




PORTRAIT OF A LADY, by Paulus Moreebe, Dutch, 1571-1638, Gift of Mr, and 
Mrs. J, H, Wade, J916. Size: 23 x 19J4 inches, 

1 ' i* '/ ] ,V- - (• V.^, H I T (Jt 


TRIUMPH OF THE HOLY SACRAMENT OVER FOLLY, by Peter Paul Rubens, 
Flemish, 1577-1640. Gift of Mr. and Mrs. J. H. Wade, 1916. Size: iSji and 41 y 6 inches. 


33 





DEPARTMENT OF PAINTINGS, GALLERY V 



MADONNA AND CHILD, by Frans Floris, Flemish, 1517-1570, Gift of Mr. and Mrs, 
J + H* Wade, 1916, Size: ji% x 26^ inches. 



LANDSCAPE WITH NYMPHS AND SATYRS, by Nicholas Poussin, French, 
1594-1665. The last gift of J. H. Wade, 1926, Size: 385^ x 50^ inches. 


34 



DEPARTMENT OF PAINTINGS, GALLERIES V-VII 



MRS. COLLYEAR AS “LESBIA AND HER DEAD BIRD,” by Sir Joshua Rey¬ 
nolds, English, 1723-1792. Gift of J. H. Wade, 1920. Size: 31^ x 26^ inches. 



CARTHAGE, by J. W. M. Turner, English, 1775-1851. Gift of Mr. and Mrs. J. H. 
Wade, 1916. Size: 43^ x 55^ inches. 





DEPARTMENT OF PAINTINGS, GALLERIES V-VII 




ARABS RESTING, by Eugene Delacroix, French, 1798-1863. Gift of Mr. and Mrs. 
J. H, Wade, 1916. Size: 1914 x 24 inches. 


TANNHAUSER, by Henri Fantin-Latour, French, 1E36-1904. Gift of Mr. and Mrs, 
J. H. Wade, 1916. Size: 33 x 39^ inches. 


3 6 








DEPARTMENT OF PAINTINGS, GALLERIES V-VII 



MOONLIGHT AT MIDNIGHT, by Jean Charles Gazin, French, 1841-1901* The 
Charles \Y. Harkness Gift, 1923. Size: 34^ x 35 inches. 



SUMMER, by Pierre Puvis de Chavannes, French, 1816-1898* Gift of Mr* and Mrs* 
J* H* Wade, 1916. Size: 59 x 91^ inches* 


37 




DEPARTMENT OF PAINTINGS, GALLERIES V^VII 



AU B 0 RD DE LA MER, by Eugene Boudin^ French, 3835-1898, Gift of Mrs. D, Z. 
Norton, 1917, Size: 14 x inches. 



LES BERGERS, by Rene Menard, French, 1862- . Gift of Ralph King, 1921, 

Size; 7014 x 99 inches. 


38 



DEPARTMENT OF PAINTINGS, GALLERIES VII-VIII 



ORPHEUS* by Odilon Redon, French* 1840-1916* Gift of J. H. Wade, 1926. 
Size: 2734 x 22^ inches. 



PORTRAIT OF MADEMOISELLE VIOLETTE H., by Odilon Redon, French, 
1840-1916. The Hinman R, Hurlbut Collection, 1926. Size: 28^ x 36% inches. 


39 



DEPARTMENT OF PAINTINGS, GALLERIES VII-VIII 



AU CAFE, or MONSIEUR BOILEAU, by Henri de Toulouse-Lautrec, French, 
1864-1892, The Hinman B. Hurlbut Collection, 1925. Size; 3134 x 2$^. inches. 


4 o 


DEPARTMENT OF PAINTINGS. GALLERIES VII-VTII 



PORTRAIT OF MISS DORA WHEELER, by William Merritt Chase, American, 
1849-1916- Gift of Mrs. Boudinot Keith, 1921. Size: 6214 x 6514 inches* 

This portrait by Chase was painted about the year 1883* In that year it was 
awarded a Gold Medal in the Internationale Kunstaustellung in Munich and 
was shown at the Paris Salon* Chase spent his student years in Munich, where 
many of the leading figures of his generation received their training. Twacht- 
man and Duveneck were studying there at the same time. “The Venetian 
Girl/* by Duveneck, illustrated on page 45, must have been painted just after 
he left Munich for further study in Italy. American art received another new' 
emphasis about the same period from the men influenced by the Rarbizon 
group in France. Homer Martin felt this very strongly., and it can be seen in 
his picture* “Wild Coast* Newport*” page 42, and in an early work of Henry 
Golden Dearth* page 43. Winslow Homer, however, is purely American* No 
one had ever painted the sea as he saw it, and “Early Morning After Storm at 
Sea,” page 42, ranked in his own mind as his greatest rendition of this sub¬ 
ject* George Bellows and Rockwell Kent follow in Homer’s footsteps* They 
are American in % r iewpoint and feeling and are representative of the best of 
the present day tendencies. 


41 






DEPARTMENT OF PAINTINGS, GALLERIES VII-VIII 



WILD COAST, NEWPORT, by Homer D. Martin American, 1836-1897* Gift of 
Leonard C* Hanna, Jr., 1923. Size: 2334 x 3b inches. 



EARLY MORNING AFTER STORM AT SEA, by Winslow Homer, American, 
1836-1910, Gift of J, H, Wade, 1924. Size: 3034 x 50 inches. 


42 








DEPARTMENT OF PAINTINGS, GALLERIES VII-VIII 



HEAD OF A BOY, by George Fuller, American, 1822-1884* The Dorothy Burnham 
Everett Collection, 1925. Size: 24 x 20 inches. 



THE STUBBLE FIELD, by Henry Golden Dearth, American, 1864-1918* Gift of 
George E. Gage and Frederic S* Porter, 1924* Size: 32 x 45^ inches* 


43 






DEPARTMENT OF PAINTINGS, GALLERIES VII-VIII 



STAG AT SHARKEY’S, by George Bellows, American, 1882-1925. The Hinman B. 
Hurlbut Collection, 1922. Size: 36^ x 48^ inches. 



if 


MAINE COAST, by Rockwell Kent, American, 1882- . The Hinman B. Hurlbut 

Collection, 1922. Size: 34^ x 44^ inches. 


44 






THE VENETIAN GIRL, by Frank Duveneck, American, 1848-1919. Gift of Mrs, 
Henry A. Everett in memory of her daughter, Dorothy Burnham Everett, 1922, Size: 
34x245^ inches* 


45 



GALLERIES IX AND X 


SPECIAL EXHIBITIONS IN GALLERIES IX AND X 

These two important galleries are set aside for temporary exhi¬ 
bitions, which are scheduled throughout the year for periods of 
from four to six weeks each. In this way the Museum is able to 
keep the public informed as to the art movements of the past 
and present more adequately than would be possible from the 
permanent collections alone. 

The Museum wishes to encourage a wider appreciation of the 
work of American artists and to this end holds the following 
exhibitions annually: Work by Cleveland Artists and Craftsmen; 
Contemporary American Oil Paintings; and Contemporary 
American Water Colors . 

Among other exhibitions of paintings held during the last 
few years are: 

Selected Canvases from the Foreign Sections of the Twenty-Second to 
the Twenty-Fifth International Exhibitions held at Carnegie Institute; 
Paintings by Ramon and Valentin de Zubiaurre; Paintings by Zuloaga 
and Sorolla; Paintings by Edouard Manet, Berthe Morisot, and Pierre 
Auguste Renoir; Paintings by the Taos Society of Artists; Paintings by 
Contemporary Americans (several exhibitions); Paintings by Thomas 
Eakins, Albert J. Ryder, and J. Alden Weir; Paintings by Anto Carte; 
Paintings by Maurice Prendergast; Fifty Years of French Art; Paintings 
by Max Bohm. 

The exhibitions of prints and drawings held in Galleries IX 
and X are usually devoted to the work of special groups of 
artists, to particular subjects, or to prints made by the same 
process. Although the larger part of the material comes from 
the Museum's permanent collection, much is borrowed from 
collectors and dealers. 

Exhibitions of Oriental subjects are largely confined to 
Chinese and Japanese painting, and to Japanese wood block 
color prints, with an occasional exhibition of contemporary 

work - THE GARDEN COURT 

In the midst of galleries the Garden Court is a pleasant oasis, 
where Museum objects are shown against a background of grow¬ 
ing plants. The soft green, and the play of water in the pool 
provide an antidote to museum fatigue and send the visitor 
back to the galleries with a renewed interest. 

In the balcony of the Court is located the splendid McMyler 
organ, upon which frequent recitals are given under conditions 
ideal for the enjoyment of music. 

46 


DEPARTMENT OF PRINTS AND DRAWINGS* GALLERY XI 



ST, ANTHONY TORMENTED BY THE DEVILS, Engraved by Martin Schon- 
gauer, German, 1440c?)-1491. The Dudley P. Allen Collection, 1913, 

The Print Collection is composed of several thousand prints dating from the 
beginnings of the art, early in the fifteenth century, to the present day. A 
selection of these is always on view in Gallery XI, and special exhibitions are 
held from time to time in adjoining galleries. The prints not on exhibition 
and a large number of reproductions may be consulted in the Print Room on 
the ground floor. The visitor’s attention is particularly called to the cases of 
material illustrating the various graphic processes, in the corridor leading to 
the Print Room. 


47 







DEPARTMENT OF PRINTS AND DRAWINGS* GALLERY XI 



Left: THE MERCHANT } from “The Dance of Death 1 " Series. Woodcut by Hans 
Holbein, the Younger, German, 1497-3 543. Gift of The Print Club, 1922* Right: CLEG, 
from the “Tarocchi Cards,” a set of fifty anonymous Italian engravings of the XV 
Century. The Dudley P. Allen Collection, 1924. 



Left: VIRGIN AND CHILD* Engraved bv Martin Schongauer, German 1440(0- 
3491. The Ralph King Collection, 1924, Right: HOLY FAMILY WITH THE DRAG¬ 
ON FLY* Engraved by Albrecht Diirer, German, 1471-1518. The Ralph King Collec¬ 
tion, 1925* 


48 


^5? If? 



























DEPARTMENT OF PRINTS AND DRAWINGS, GALLERY XI 



Left: THE GRIFFIN* Engraved by Martin Schongauer, German, i440{?)-i 493. The Dudley 
P* Allen Collection, 1926* Right: THE CRLGIFIXION. Engraved by Martin Schongauer, 
German* i44o(?)-i49i* Gift of The Print Club, 1927. 



Left: THE LAST SUPPER, from "The Great Passion/* Woodcut by Albrecht Diirer, 
German, 1471-1518. Gift of The Print Club* 1926, in memory of Ralph King. Right: 
MELANCHOLIA* Engraved by Albrecht Diirer, German, 1471-1518. Gift of Leonard C* 
Hanna, Jr*, 1926, in memory of Ralph King. 



J 




49 















DEPARTMENT OF PRINTS AND DRAWINGS, GALLERY XI 



ADORATION OF THE KINGS. Engraved by Lucas van Leyden, Dutch, 1494-1^33, 
The Charles W. Harkness Collection, 1923. 


50 










DEPARTMENT OF PRINTS AND DRAWINGS^ GALLERY XI 



A PRINT FROM THE SERIES, “THE BULLFIGHTS.” Etching and Aquatint by 
Francisco Goya, Spanish, 1746-1828* The Charles W. Harkness Collection, 1921* 



THE CANAL LOCK AT DOLO. Etched by Antonio Canale (Canaletto), Italian, 
1697-1763, Gift of The Print Club, 1925* 


51 






DEPARTMENT OF PRINTS AND DRAWINGS, GALLERY XI 



Left: CARDINAL DE RETZ. Engraved by Robert Nanteml, French, 16123(?)-1678. 
Gift of Mrs. Perry W. Harvey, 1922. Right: ST. CATHERINE IN THE CLOUDS. 
Etched by Peter Paul Rubens, Flemish, 1577-1640. The Ralph King Collection, 1923. 



Left: FAINTER*$ STUDIO, Etched by Adriaen van Ostade, Dutch, 2610-1685, 
Right: FANTASIES: SATYR FAMILY, Etched by Giovanni Battista Tiepolo, Italian, 
i695(?)-i77o. Both are gifts of Leonard C, Hanna, Jr,, 1924, 


5 2 
















DEPARTMENT OF PRINTS AND DRAWINGS. GALLERY XI 



Left: SUPPER AT EMMAUS. Etched by Rembrandt van Rijn, Dutch, 1606-1669. 
Gift of The Print Club, 1922. Right: THE GREAT JEWISH BRIDE. Etched by 
Rembrandt van Rijn, Dutch, 1606-1669. Bequest of Ralph King, 1926. 



THE THREE CROSSES. Etched by Rembrandt van Rijn, Dutch, 3606-1669* 
Bequest of Ralph King, 1926. 


53 







DEPARTMENT OF PRINTS AND DRAWINGS., GALLERY XI 


ANNIE HA DEN* Etched by James McNeil Whistler* American, 1834-1903* The 
Ralph King Collection* 1922* 

Whistler said he would rest his reputation on this etching. The Whistler 
etchings and lithographs are among the most important items in the Print 
Collection. 


54 



















DEPARTMENT OF PRINTS AND DRAWINGS^ GALLERY XI 


SKETCH OF AN IMAGINARY ROMAN BUILDING. Drawing by Hubert Robert, 
French, 1733-1808. Gift of Leonard C. Hanna, Jr. s 1926, 



55 




























DEPARTMENT OF PRINTS AND DRAWINGS, GALLERY XI 


MADAME RAOUL-RQCHETTE. Drawing by J, A, Dominique Ingres* French) 
1780-1867, Purchase from the J* H* Wade Fund* 1927, 

















DEPARTMENT OF PRINTS AND DRAWINGS, GALLERY XI 



LES AMATEURS DE PEINTURE. Drawing by Honore Daumier, French, t 3 oS- 
1879* The Dudley P. Allen Collection, 1927. 


57 











DEPARTMENT OF ORIENTAL ART, GALLERY XII 



TERRA-COTTA HEAD OF BUDDHA. I-III Century. The Dudley P. Allen Collec¬ 
tion, 1922. 


A typical example of the hybrid art usually called “Graeco-Buddhist,” which 
grew up in North India in the centuries which followed Alexander the Great's 
conquest in 326 B.C. The Hellenistic tradition in a diluted form was carried 
along the trade routes to China and thence to Japan by way of Korea. 

In this gallery are gathered the arts of peoples who have inhabited that part 
of the earth's surface east of Constantinople, as far as South China, and from 
Constantinople through northern Africa westward to Spain. This vast terri¬ 
tory includes Egypt since the Arab conquest, Morocco, Moorish Spain, and 
Sicily, as well as Turkey, Arabia, Persia, India, Tibet, Siam, and French 
Indo-China. 


58 



DEPARTMENT OF ORIENTAL ART* GALLERY XII 



HEAD OF A KHMER DIVINITY. Possibly a posthumous royal portrait Khmer, 

XI Century. The Dudley P. Allen Collection, 3923. 

The Khmers built up a remarkable civilization* lasting for more than eight 
centuries, in the depths of the tropical jungles in what is now modern Cam¬ 
bodia, a part of French Indo-China. The temples and monuments left by 
these forgotten people are among the most extensive and impressive ruins in 
the world. This head comes from Angkor* the ancient capital. 


59 


DEPARTMENT OF ORIENTAL ART, GALLERY XII 



PARVATIj the chief female Hindu deity. XIV-XV Century. Gift of 

J. H. Wade, 1924* . v ?. 

This little bronze was made to be carried in religious processions. The pro¬ 
portions of the figure are based on the unit of measure, the “tala,” the dis¬ 
tance between the base of the headdress and the point of the chin. 


60 






DEPARTMENT OF ORIENTAL ART, GALLERY XII 



SO-CALLED POLISH RUG. Persian, first half of XVII Century. Purchase from 
the J. H. Wade Fund, 1927. 


6l 










DEPARTMENT OF ORIENTAL ART, GALLERY XIII 




Left: STELE OF A BUDDHIST TRINITY. Chinese, Wei Dynasty', dated 537* 
The John Huntington Collection, 1924. Right: KWANYIN. Chinese, T J ang Dynasty, 
618-907. The Ralph King Collection, 1915. 






Left: POTTERY HEAD OF A LOHAN. One of the sixteen disciples of Buddha. 
Chinese, Thing Dynasty, 618-907. The Worcester R. Warner Collection, 1917. Right: 
HEAD OF A BODHISATTYA, Chinese, North Wei Dynasty, 386^535, The Ralph 
King Collection, 1915. 


62 














DEPARTMENT OF ORIENTAL ART, GARDEN COURT 



MARBLE STATUE OF - MiW: 
R, Warner Collection, 1915. > 


A* Chinese, n ^ ^giy The Worcester 

O-Al r - T o C$nr>, 


The base, which is dated 627, although contemporary, does not belong to the 
figure. The dignity, repose, and aloofness seen in this statue are characteristic 
of all Chinese sculpture. 


6 3 







DEPARTMENT OF ORIENTAL ART, GALLERY XIII 




DEPARTMENT OF ORIENTAL ART, GALLERY XIV 




MORTUARY POTTERY; CELADON WARE* Excavated near Songdo,the ancient 
capital of Korea, Korean, Korai Period* 920-1392* The John L, Severance Collection, 
1923. 


BUDDHIST TRIPTYCH OF GILDED BRONZE* Korean, Chosen Period, 1393- 
1910, The Worcester R, Warner Collection, 19^, 







DEPARTMENT OF ORIENTAL ART, GALLERY XIV 



GILDED LACQUER FIGURE OF YAKUSHI BUDDHA, GOD OF MEDICINE. 
Japanese, Tokugawa Period, 1700-1850. The Worcester R. Warner Collection, 1915. 

The annals of Chinese art go back about three thousand years. In Japan 
there was virtually no art prior to the introduction of Buddhism in the 
sixth century. 

Oriental art is less obvious and less progressive, though more symbolic, 
than Western art. 


66 












DEPARTMENT OF ORIENTAL ART> GALLERY XIV 



SWORD GUARD. (Tsuba) Jap. 
anese, Tokugawa Period, 1700- 
1850, The D. Z, Norton Collection, 
1919. Right: BRONZE MIRROR. 
Japanese, Fujiwara Period, 900- 
1200. The D. Z. Norton Collection, 
191 ?' 



Mirrors were often buried with the dead to ward off evil spirits. 



Left: A LESSON IN PENMANSHIP. Japanese wood block color print by Utamaro. 
Late XVIII Century. Gift of J. H. Wade, 1921. Right: KWANNON, bearing a lotus 
dais on which to receive the faithful souls. Wood and lacquer. Japanese, Kamakura 
Period, 1200-1400. The Ralph King Collection, 1919. 


67 








DEPARTMENT OF EGYPTIAN ART, GALLERY XV 




68 


Left: LION-HEADED GODDESS, SEKHMET. Right: PORTRAIT HEAD OF A 
KING. Egyptian, XVIII Dynasty, 1580-1350 R, C + The John Huntington Collec¬ 
tion, 1916 and 1914. 

Egyptian sculpture in the round is primarily monumental. It is frequently in very hard stone, like 
this syenite and diorite, giving the impression of eternal duration. 










JiH G 


u] %E3 3C 


6 9 








DEPARTMENT OF EGYPTIAN ART 5 GALLERY XV 



DOOR OF THE SOUL, OR KA, Egyptian, XVIII Dynasty, 1580-1350 B. C. The 
Edward S. Harkness Collection, 1921* 


While European art is based on the convention of representing only what 
can be seen at one time, Egyptian art is based on the convention of represent¬ 
ing as much as possible, each part—eye, face, shoulders—in the position 
easiest to see* The inscription starts in the center of the lintel and reads in 
both directions, giving a much better balance than a European inscription, 
which reads from left to right. 


70 
























DEPARTMENT OF DECORATIVE ARTS, ARMOR COURT 



RONDACHES. Spanish and German, XVI Century. Gift of Mr. and Mrs. John L. 
Severance, 1916. Sizes: Diameter 22^ inches. Diameter 23^ inches; spike 1^ inches. 

Examples of fine workmanship in the Severance Collection of Arms and 
Armor. 

71 







DEPARTMENT OF DECORATIVE ARTS, ARMOR COURT 



CABASSET. Italian, late XVI Century. Gift of Mr. and Mrs. John L. Severance, 
1916. Size: 9^ x 11^ inches. 


This is a fine example of the highly enriched decoration characteristic of 
armor when it was made more for show than for actual use. 


72 


DEPARTMENT OF DECORATIVE ARTS, ARMOR COURT 



ESPALIERS OR SHOULDER PLATES* Probably by the Milanese Armorer, Negroli, 
Italian, XVI Century. Gift of Mr, and Mrs. John L. Severance, 1916, Sizes 534 x 534 
inches. 


73 


















DEPARTMENT OF CLASSICAL ART, GARDEN COURT, LOGGIA 



ARCHAIC HEAD OF A GOAT. Greek, about 500 B. C. Gift of Leonard C, Hanna, 
Jr., 1926, 



GREEK POTTERY. VIILIII Century B, C. Purchased from the J. H. Wade Fund, 
the A. W. Ellenberger, Sr. Endowment Fund, and the CharJes W, Harkness Endow¬ 
ment Fund, 1926-1927. 


74 









DEPARTMENT OF CLASSICAL ART, GARDEN COURT, LOGGIA 



GREEK HEAD* Type of V Century B. C. Gift of Mrs. Leonard C* Hanna, 1924* 

Marked with the cool clarity of fifth century sculpture but also with a softness 
suggestive of a later date* A part of the nose is restored in plaster* 



GREEK POTTERY. VII-V Century B.C.The Dudley R Allen Collection and Gifts 
of j* H* Wade and Mrs. Leonard C. Hanna, 1923-1924. 


75 









DEPARTMENT OF CLASSICAL ART, ROTUNDA 



ATHLETE. Greek, Type of V Century B, C* The John Huntington Collection, 1924. 

A11 ancient marble copy made in the early years of the Roman empire after a 
Greek bronze statue in the style of Myron, the most famous sculptor of 
athletes of the fifth century B + C + , popularly known through his “Discus 
Thrower.” The supports were of course unnecessary in the original bronze* 
There are practically no restorations. 


76 





DEPARTMENT OF CLASSICAL ART, GARDEN COURT, LOGGIA 



GREEK GRAVE RELIEF. About 400 B. C. Gift of Mrs. Leonard C, Hanna, 1924, 

The grave monuments of Athens afford some of the finest expressions of 
Greek spirit. 


77 




DEPARTMENT OF CLASSICAL ART, GARDEN COURT, LOGGIA 



TERRA-COTTA FIGURINE OF APHRODITE. Greek, III Century B. C. 
The John Huntington Collection, 1927. 



DEPARTMENT OF CLASSICAL ART, GARDEN COURT, LOGGIA 








BRONZE STATUETTE OF APOLLO* Greek, IV Century B, C. Purchase from 
the J* H. Wade Fund, 1927* 


79 



DEPARTMENT OF CLASSICAL ART, GARDEN COURT, LOGGIA 



ROMAN TORSO OF APOLLO, 27 B, C—14 A, D, Gift of J, H, Wade, 1924* 

Roman sculpture of the time of Augustus was more elegant than the earlier 
Greek sculpture, not so simple, not so profound, but lovely in line and surface. 


80 



TEXTILE (STUDY ROOM* TEXTILES 



Coptic* V'VI Century. 

The John Huntington Collection, 1916. 



Italian, XV Century. 

The Dudley P. Allen Collection, 1918. 



Persian, XVI Century. 

The J. H. Wade Collection, 1924., 


Persian, about 

The J. H. Wade Collection, 1924, 


The Textile Collection consists of an important group of pieces, representative 
of historic types in many periods. It may be consulted under supervision in 
the Textile Room on the ground floor. 















TEXTILE STUDY ROOM, LACES 




THREE PIECES OF LACE, From The Ellen Garretson Wade Memorial Collec¬ 
tion* 1923, 

The Lace Collection is largely made up of the important pieces which form The 
Ellen Garretson Wade Memorial Collection, presented by J. H. Wade, Jr., 
G. Garretson Wade, and Mrs, E, B. Greene, In addition, J* H. Wade gave a 
large group of type pieces. Other donors have added fine examples. The up¬ 
per piece is early XVIII Century, flat Venetian point; the middle flounce is 
of the same period, but made in Brussels; the lower one is Milanese tape 
lace, with scenes from the story of Joseph. 


82 





SERVICES TO THE PUBLIC 

THE LIBRARY 

The Library of the Museum contains books, magazines, 
photographs, and lantern slides dealing mainly with fine and 
applied art. Books are not lent, but slides and photographs may 
be borrowed for purposes of instruction. 

THE EDUCATIONAL DEPARTMENT 

The opportunities offered to the public by the Educational 
Department may be briefly summarized as follows: 

Work With Adults —Clubs, conventions, and other adult 
groups may arrange for guidance in the Museum by appoint¬ 
ment. Lectures are given Friday evening at eight-fifteen, and 
Sunday afternoon at four o’clock during the winter months. 
There are some half dozen courses given in art history and art 
appreciation. 

Work With Children —Classes from the city schools, as from 
the private, parochial, and suburban schools, visit the Museum 
for work in connection with their studies. Besides the Museum 
staff, two teachers are stationed at the Museum by the Board 
of Education. 

Drawing, modeling, and singing classes for members’ children 
are held each Saturday morning during the school season, as 
are free advanced drawing classes to which children are admit¬ 
ted through competition. 

Entertainments are held in the Lecture Hall from October 
to June at two o’clock each Saturday afternoon; and on Sunday 
afternoon at four o’clock there is a “Museum Hour” for little 
children and one for older boys and girls. This “Hour” is 
devoted to story telling or talks with lantern slides. 

THE DEPARTMENT OF MUSICAL ARTS 

The Department of Musical Arts is maintained by an endow¬ 
ment fund created in memory of P. J. McMyler by Mrs. Mc- 
Myler and her daughters, Gertrude and Doris. The Museum 
organ was also made possible by the same generous memorial. 
The organ recitals are heard in the Garden Court, a delightful 
place for such music. In the Lecture Hall are held the other 
events, consisting of various forms of music, and talks about 
music. On Saturday mornings there are classes in appreciation 

83 


PUBLICATIONS 


of music for members' children, and some of the Saturday 
afternoon entertainments are for children. Both in the subjects 
chosen and in the manner of presentation the Department has 
in mind not so much a series of concerts as an educational 
project designed to foster a love of the best in music among the 
people of Cleveland. 


PUBLICATIONS 

The first publication of the Museum was the catalogue of 
the Inaugural Exhibition of The Cleveland Museum of Art, 
printed in 1916. A few of these catalogues are still available at 
$3.00 a volume* (Size: 914 x I 2 j^; 3bo pages; 145 full page 
illustrations.) 

The catalogue of the Severance Collection of Arms and 
Armor, by Helen Ives Gilchrist, a beautifully printed and 
illustrated book, was published by the Museum in 1924. The 
introduction by Bashford Dean, Curator of Armor of The 
Metropolitan Museum of Art, adds much to the value of the 
book. The edition is limited to three hundred, with a few 
copies only for sale at $40.00 a volume. (Size: 9 x 12; 289 
pages; 51 photogravure plates; 7 text drawings, and many 
armorers’ marks). 

“Japanese Sculpture of the Suiko Period," by Langdon 
Warner, is a handsomely printed volume from the Yale Univer¬ 
sity Press. The present price is $30.00, to be advanced to $40.00 
when two hundred copies shall have been sold. (Size: 13 x 16; 
77 pages of text; 145 full page plates.) 

At the sales desk the following publications are also sold: 
“The Catalogue of the Collection of Paintings Presented to The 
Cleveland Museum of Art by Mrs. Liberty E. Holden,” an 
illustrated description of the Museum's collection of Italian 
Primitives compiled by Miss Stella Rubinstein, price, postpaid, 
twenty-five cents; “The Handbook of The Severance Collection 
of Arms and Armor,” by Helen Ives Gilchrist, price, postpaid 
fifty cents; “The Museum Handbook,” price, postpaid, fifty 
cents; and the Bulletin of The Cleveland Museum of Art, 
published ten times a year, price, postpaid, $1.00 a year, single 
copies ten cents; “The Golden Bird and Other Stories,” by 
Katharine Gibson; “Marionettes, Masks and Shadows,” by 
Winifred H. Mills and Louise M* Dunn. 

84 


HISTORY AND BUILDING 
OF THE CLEVELAND MUSEUM OF ART 


The Cleveland Museum of Art grew out of the creation of 
trusts by John Huntington and Horace Kelley, “for the purpose 
of establishing and maintaining in the City of Cleveland a 
gallery and museum of art for the promotion and cultivation of 
art in said City.” 

The first Building Committee was formed in 1905. Actual 
work on the building was commenced in May, 1913, on the site 
in Wade Park presented by Mr. and Mrs. J. H. Wade. The 
Museum was incorporated as a corporation not for profit in 
1913, following the appointment of Frederic Allen Whiting as 
Director; and on June 6, 1916, the building was formally dedi¬ 
cated and opened to the public. 

Building —The building is 300 feet long and 1.20 feet broad. 
It is classical in style, the Ionic order being used in the south 
portico and the end pavilions. The cost was about $1,250,000.00. 

Marble —The exterior is of white Georgia marble. A variety 
of marbles is used in the interior. The dado on the main floor, the 
rotunda columns, and handrails of the main stairs are of Char- 
len marble, from Maryland. The walls of the foyer and corridor on 
the ground floor are of English vein, Italian marble,imported from 
Italy. All marble floors in the building are of Tennessee marble. 
Walls of the Armor Court are of Grey Canyon sandstone, 
quarried at Amherst, Ohio. The four columns supporting the 
Garden Court balcony are of Egyptian granite, with Carrara 
marble capitals. They were probably part of an ancient Roman 
temple, and were cut down about 1780 or 1790 for use in the 
Torlonia Palace in Rome, the marble capitals being carved at 
that time to fit them. 

Lighting System —The gallery lighting was planned by a 
committee of experts who conducted extended experiments at 
Nela Park. The south galleries and the courts are lighted from 
above. In diffusing chambers between the upper and lower 
gallery skylights are metal louvres which control the sunlight. 
Daylight lamps in prismatic glass reflectors below these louvres 
supply artificial light, which is directed on the gallery walls. 

Ventilation —The ventilation is indirect. Air is taken from 
the roof, washed, brought to the proper degree of heat and 
humidity, and forced to all parts of the building. 

85 



Ground Floor Plan 


GR.QUNJ) STORY, plan THE. CLEVELAND MUSEUM OF ART 
































































































Exhibition Floor Plan 


THE CLEVELAND MUSEUM OF ART 



























































THE CLEVELAND MUSEUM OF ART 


EAST BOULEVARD, CLEVELAND, OHIO 
OFFICERS OF THE CORPORATION 
President, John L, Severance 
Vice Presidents, Wm. G. Mather, Leonard C. Hanna, Jr. 
Treasurer, John Huntington Hord Secretary, Frederic Allen Whiting 


BOARD OF TRUSTEES 
Henry G. Dalton William G. Mather 
Edward B, Greene Charles L, Murfey 
Leonard C, Hanna, Jr, F. F. Prentiss 
John H, Hord William B* Sanders 

Samuel Mather John L. Severance 

EXECUTIVE COMMITTEE 

The President and the First Vice President, 
ex officii $ 

E. B. Greene John H. Hord F. F. Prentiss 
L, C. Hanna, Jr* W. B. Sanders 

ACCESSIONS COMMITTEE 
The President and the Director, ex qffidh 
E. B. Greene L. C. Hanna, Jr, 

W. G. Mather 


ADVISORY COUNCIL 


I'he President of Western Reserve University 
The President of Case School of Applied Science 


Charles T. Brooks 
Charles F. Brush 

E. $. Burke, Jr. 
Harold T, Clark 
Ralph M. Coe 

F. E. Drury 


Mrs. H. H. Johnson 
Alfred K. Keltey 
Mrs, Ralph Thrall King 
Woods King 
Amos B. McNalry 
Laurence H. Norton 


Mrs* Henry A, Everett Kenyon V. Painter 


Paul L* Feiss 
Salmon P. Halle 
H. M. Hanna, Jr. 
Edward S. Hark ness 
Myron T. Herrick 
Guerdon S, Holden 
David S, Ingalls 


James Parmelee 
Frederic S, Porter 
Mrs, F, F. Prentiss 
Ambrose Swasey 
Worcester R. Warner 
E. L, Whittemore 
Lewis B. Williams 


MEMBERSHIP 

Foundation Benefactors contribute or 
devise 

Endowment Benefactors contribute or 
devise 

Benefactors contribute or devise 
Fellows in Perpetuity contribute or 
devise 

Fellows for Life contribute 
Life Members contribute 
Fellows pay annually 
Sustaining Members pay annually 
Annual Members pay annually 


$500,000 

ico,000 
25,000 

5,000 

1,000 

100 

100 

*5 

10 


Full particulars may be had upon request. 


ADMISSION 

Open daily from 9 a. m. to 5 p, m., except as 
follows: 

Wednesday 9 a. m. to 10 p, m. 

Sunday 1 p. m, to 10 p, m. 

Free days: Sunday, Wednesday, Saturday, 
and public holidays. Friday is also free from 
7 to 10 p. m. during the lecture season. 

On other days an admission fee of 25 cents is 
charged to all except members, holders of com¬ 
plimentary tickets, and children of school age. 

Closed all day on July 4, Thanksgiving Day, 
and December 25 


STAFF OF THE MUSEUM 
Director, Frederic Allen Whiting 
Assistant Director, Rossi ter Howard 
Secretaries to the Director, Deris S. Whitalar 
and Clara E, Gaetjens 

Curator of Decorative Arts, William M. Mi Hi ken 
Assistant Curator of Tex tiles,Gertrude Underhill 
Curator of Paintings, William M, Mil liken 
Curator of Prints, Henry Sayles Francis 
Assistant Curator of Prints, Leona E. Prasse 
Curator of Classical Art, Rossker Howard 
European Representative, Harold W, Parsons 
Registrar, Eleanor R. Sackett 
Cashier, Isabel Bloomberg 
Curator of Educational Work, Rossiter Howard 
Assistant Curator, Louise M, Dunn 
Assistants, Gertrude Underhill, Ruth F. Ruggles, 
Alice W, Howard, Marguerite Bloomberg 
Literary Assistant, Katharine Gibson 
Curator of Musical Arts, Arthur W. Quimby 
Librarian, Nell G, Sill 

Assistants, Harriet H. Thwing, Ella Tallman 
Charlotte Van der Veer 
Margaret Williams Dawson 
Photography and Printing, E. A. Buggies 
Membership and Publicity Secretary, LT, Frary 
Superintendent of Buildings and Grounds 
John W. McCabe 


GALLERY ADVICE 

The members of the staff are prepared to assist 
visitors, but their many duties make it advisable 
that appointments be arranged in advance. 

LIBRARY 

A reference library of works on art, with cur¬ 
rent art magazines, will be found on the ground 
floor. Open from 9 to 5 daily except Sunday; 
from October to May inclusive, Sunday 3 to 6, 
Wednesday 7 to 9. 

GIFTS TO THE MUSEUM 
The Director will be pleased to discuss desirable 
gifts, or ways of assisting in the work of the 
Museum, with friends who may wish to offer 
their help. 

WHEEL CHAIRS 

For the convenience of visitors wheel chairs are 
available. No charge is made unless an attend¬ 
ant is desired, for which service 50 cents an 
hour is charged, 

PUBLICATIONS 

Catalogues, photographs, postcards, Bulletins , 
etc., are for sale at the desk near the main 
entrance. Orders by mail are invited. 

LUNCH ROOM 

The Lunch'Room at the ground floor entrance 
is open to the public from 12 m. to 5 p. m. 
Dinner served Friday from 6 to 7 p. m. during 
the lecture season. 


1 T i)87t | 

08/11 no-raH>o.“ S 










,fK(o 

1920